ICONIC SHOULDERS

The Black Madmen and women of the Golden Age, the mid-1960s to the early-1990s, blazed new paths that reshaped how Blacks were seen in the media.

Barbara Gardner Proctor , was a trailblazing Chicago businesswoman who brought the Beatles' music to America—literally—as a Vee-Jay Records executive, and the first African American woman to own an advertising agency.


Barbara Gardner Proctor, was a trailblazing Chicago businesswoman who brought the Beatles' music to America—literally—as a Vee-Jay Records executive, and the first African American woman to own an advertising agency.

Valerie Graves  was part of the UniWorld team that won the Burger King general market account in 1993. They took the account from a major Madison Avenue agency. In vol. 1 of our series, Marc Strachan spoke to the effectiveness of multicultural agency talent and UniWorld's performance here is proof.

Valerie Graves was part of the UniWorld team that won the Burger King general market account in 1993. They took the account from a major Madison Avenue agency. In vol. 1 of our series, Marc Strachan spoke to the effectiveness of multicultural agency talent and UniWorld's performance here is proof.

What makes some of the creative leaders of our industry legends? What or who inspired them to pursue the career they did? What inspires them today? And how do they inspire those around them to think differently? Carol Williams, the writer of Secret Deodorant’s iconic “Strong enough for a man” tag line, talks about her journey to the Hall of Fame.

"If you were white, I'd hire you immediately.” That's how Advertising Hall of Famer Roy Eaton recalls his first job interview at Young & Rubicam, where he began his career in 1955. In 1955, Young & Rubicam hired Roy Eaton, a Phi Beta Kappa with a master’s degree in music. Mr. Eaton, who applied to the agency virtually on a whim, talked executives into letting him write tryout ad copy, and then sample jingles.